To view this online go to: http://www.infoinc.com/NAMSS/0216_web.html

Banner
February 2016
HISG
GreeleyDec2015

A Word from the President


Welcome to the February issue of NAMSS Gateway. As we continue into 2016, I am excited to share that in early summer, NAMSS will be rolling out two brand new education programs – the Leadership Certificate Program and the Virtual Executive Roundtables – both aimed at enhancing leadership within the medical services profession.

The Leadership Certificate Program is a series of live and online courses designed for certified medical services professionals (MSPs) to obtain leadership skills. Live courses will be offered at NAMSS education events, while online modules will be available through the NAMSS online education center. Participants must possess CPCS or CMPSM certification and have at least five years of industry experience. This exciting opportunity allows MSPs dedicated to the field to expand their experience and gain further understanding of how to be impactful leaders within the industry, their facilities and their teams.

The Virtual Executive Roundtables are a structured webinar and reading series designed for high-level MSPs interested in learning ancillary skills outside of their current roles. The curriculum includes quarterly sessions with high-level speakers and facilitated discussions, alternated with quarterly reading assignments, and provides Continuing Education (CE) credits. Participants must possess CPCS or CMPSM certification and have at least 10 years of industry experience. The Virtual Executive Roundtables allow MSPs in similar positions across the country to connect with their peers and learn from experts year-round.

We are excited about these incredible educational programs and hope you will be on the lookout for more information in the coming months!

Bonnie Gutierrez, BHA, CPCS, CPMSM
NAMSS President
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link

Headlines


News From NAMSS
2016 NAMSS Education Summit
Renewal Reminder
Start Saving for NAMSS’ Newest Education Programs!
Call for NAMSS Instructors
Social Corner

Industry News
"Assessing the Competency of Older Physicians"
"Report: Medical Boards Overlook Doctors' Sexual Misconduct"
"Fewer Surgical Deaths Linked to Facilities With High-Quality Nursing"
"Illinois Supreme Court Rules Credentialing Applications are Discoverable in Case Against Hospital"
"Studer Group: More Than Half of Physicians Feel Leaders Don't Do Enough to Combat Burnout"
"Small Number of Doctors Behind Big Share of Malpractice Claims"
"Workarounds in Hospitals Raise Ethical Questions"
"Medicaid Expansion Could Mean More Hiring, Investments by Hospitals"


News From NAMSS


2016 NAMSS Education Summit

Steer clear of the cold this winter and head to Orlando, Florida for the NAMSS Education Summit, taking place March 11–12, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. Spend your days engaged in our interactive workshops and prepare for certification, while spending your evenings out and about in Orlando’s International Drive resort area, offering world-class attractions, non-stop entertainment, fine dining, and high-end shopping.

Choose from three two-day workshops, each designed to prepare you for certification and your role as a medical services professional (MSP), including Credentialing Specialist (CPCS) Certification Preparation Course, Medical Services Management (CPMSM) Certification Preparation Course, and Credentialing 101.

Visit the NAMSS website for more information about the NAMSS Education Summit including registration, course descriptions, and hotel and travel information.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines
Renewal Reminder

NAMSS Members: Have you renewed your NAMSS Membership? If not, there is still time to maintain your member benefits! Click here to renew online (you will need your member login handy). Renewing today ensures you remain a part of a network of over 5,500 MSPs, earn valuable education at a discount, and maintain access to valuable resources, like Synergy.

Need a paper invoice? Simply login to the website, navigate to the "My Profile" page under the Membership tab, and click on your dues invoice. Print the invoice and submit it to your facility for a check. Need assistance? Contact info@namss.org.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines
Start Saving for NAMSS’ Newest Education Programs!

In the coming months, NAMSS will launch two new education programs designed to develop leaders within the medical services profession: the Leadership Certificate Program and the Virtual Executive Roundtables. Additional details will be available on the NAMSS website this spring.

Leadership Certificate Program: Online modules cost $949 for members and $1,849 for non-members; live courses cost $533 for members ($583 after the early bird deadline) and $633 for non-members ($683 after the early bird deadline).

Virtual Executive Roundtables: Online modules cost $495 for members and $595 for non-members.

Make sure to budget for these exciting programs set to launch in early summer!
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Return to Headlines
Call for NAMSS Instructors

Interested in teaching the next wave of MSPs and NAMSS Certificants? NAMSS offers a variety of live, classroom-style courses and workshops geared toward everything from credentialing best-practices and professional development to certification preparation. NAMSS is currently looking for new instructors to be trained to teach these courses. If interested, please complete the following application form and submit it to education@namss.org by Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Click here to download the application.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines
Social Corner

Update Your LinkedIn Photo
A profile picture is very important on LinkedIn because it is how you make your first impression. More people are willing to connect with you if you have a picture—a way to put a face with your name. Use your updated headshot or take a professional photo on your own.

Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Industry News


Assessing the Competency of Older Physicians
Diagnostic Imaging (02/03/16) Perna, Gabriel

The number of older doctors is on the rise, presenting a potential conflict that practice managers may have to deal with in the coming years -- how to legally assess aging physicians. The American Medical Association (AMA) states that the number of physicians older than 65 has quadrupled since 1975 and now accounts for roughly 25 percent of all doctors. In response, the AMA has sought to develop guidelines and methods to screen and assess such older professionals to ensure they are competent in providing care to patients. The organization is presently in the planning stages of implementing this policy, reporting that it will gather perspectives from different stakeholder representatives prior to moving forward.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Report: Medical Boards Overlook Doctors' Sexual Misconduct
Philadelphia Inquirer (02/10/16) McCullough, Marie

State medical boards are failing to take action against many doctors who committed some form of sexual misconduct against their patients, a new study by the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen shows. The research is the first ever published to analyze information on physician sexual misconduct from the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB). For years, Public Citizen has pushed state medical boards to do a better job disciplining problem doctors. Its latest study found that a relatively small number -- 1,039 -- of the country's 850,085 physicians had sexual misconduct-related reports to the NPDB between Jan. 1, 2003, and Sept. 30, 2013. Such misconduct can be verbal, physical, or both. Of those doctors with such reports, 76 percent were disciplined only by a medical board. The remaining 24 percent had reports of clinical privilege restrictions by hospitals or malpractice payments by insurers. Most, though, were not disciplined for their misbehavior by state medical boards.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Fewer Surgical Deaths Linked to Facilities With High-Quality Nursing
Outpatient Surgery (01/21/16) Gapinski, Kendal

According to a new JAMA Surgery study, patients who undergo surgery at hospitals recognized for their superior nursing staffs have better outcomes at similar or lower costs than other hospitals. Hospitals with better nursing environments and above-average staffing levels had a lower 30-day post-op mortality rate than those with below-average staffing. The study also found the costs for treating patients at both the Magnet and standard hospitals were not significantly different, suggesting that those facilities with high-quality nursing represented an overall better value for patients. "A surprising finding was that better nurse staffing throughout the hospital does not have to be more costly. Indeed, we found that Magnet hospitals achieved lower mortality at the same or lower costs by admitting 40 percent fewer patients to intensive care units and shortening length of hospital stay," said study author Linda Aiken, Director of the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Illinois Supreme Court Rules Credentialing Applications are Discoverable in Case Against Hospital
National Law Review (01/26/16)

Last month, the Illinois Supreme Court issued an opinion in the case of Klaine v. Southern Illinois Hospital Services, maintaining that applications submitted in the hospital's confidential credentialing process are discoverable. The court based its decision on the fact that legal action was brought against the hospital for "negligent credentialing." Such claims are a well-known legal mechanism to establish a separate basis of liability for the hospital where an independent doctor's conduct is the primary basis of the liability claim. In the Klaine case, the defendant was a company that operates a number of hospitals being sued for negligent credentialing of a staff physician. The plaintiffs sought production of applications for staff privileges, along with case histories of surgical procedures performed at various facilities by the applicant. The court reviewed the defendant's contention that applications for staff privileges are non-discoverable under the Health Care Professional Credentials Data Collect Act. The court ruled that the applications were "highly relevant" to the cause of action.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Studer Group: More Than Half of Physicians Feel Leaders Don't Do Enough to Combat Burnout
Becker's Hospital Review (02/03/16) Rappleye, Emily

The latest Studer Group survey cautions that burnout could significantly add to the strain of the national physician shortage. Of the more than 350 practicing physician respondents, 90 percent said they have experienced symptoms of burnout at some point in their careers. Of those, 65 percent said they even have considered leaving the medical profession as a result. Studer Group Executive Medical Director Rob Schreiner says his firm "is working hard to reverse that national trend by diagnosing and treating root causes, and helping our partner organizations deploy changes in physician workflow and culture that prevent physician burnout." Physicians reported the top factors contributing to their burnout were such psychological stressors as too much change too fast and feelings of disconnect from patients and community. Those most frequently affected by burnout have about a decade to 20 years of experience, according to the research.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Small Number of Doctors Behind Big Share of Malpractice Claims
CBS News (01/27/16) Pallarito, Karen

Just 1 percent of active U.S. physicians are responsible for nearly a third of the nation's paid malpractice claims, a new study finds. In addition, researchers found that the more paid claims doctors incurred, the higher their risk of future paid claims. Study lead author David Studdert, professor of medicine and law at Stanford University, says the results suggest it may be possible to identify "claim-prone" doctors and intervene before they encounter additional claims. He adds, "I think a lot of liability insurers and health care organizations have not taken that analytical step to really understand who these folks are."
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Workarounds in Hospitals Raise Ethical Questions
HealthLeaders Media (01/25/16) Pecci, Alexandra Wilson

Workarounds in hospitals can lead to ethical concerns. The Hastings Center's Nancy Berlinger discusses what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable workarounds. She cites two reasons why they are of ethical concern. "One is because the system itself is usually the source of the pressure to create the workarounds: the basic disconnect, between [how] the organization imagines work is happening and what people feel that they're actually forced to do, usually under pressure to be efficient, to get the job done, and so on," Berlinger says. "[Another is] that sometimes people feel that they have to work around rules that seem unfair." Berlinger notes healthcare system workers face enormous pressure to complete tasks, finish rounds, and clock out by certain times. "So when more rules are added in the name of patient safety, it can, paradoxically, make safety less certain because you're putting people under pressure to reduce and condense those rules in some way."
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines

Medicaid Expansion Could Mean More Hiring, Investments by Hospitals
New Orleans Times-Picayune (01/14/16) Litten, Kevin

In Louisiana, Medicaid expansion could mean big changes for hospitals statewide as they start to see new revenue from patients who had been uninsured. Among the biggest challenges hospitals have faced is how to pay for treating patients without insurance. In some cases, hospitals have closed emergency rooms because they couldn't afford to treat those who could not pay. Gov. John Bel Edwards' decision to expand Medicaid will draw new federal funding for reimbursing medical providers who treat people who qualify for Medicaid, most of whom are the working poor. Hospitals have pushed for Medicaid expansion because it would provide a more dependable source of revenue they haven't had in years past. Adam Searing, a professor at the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, says there also tends to be more health care jobs created in Medicaid expansion states.
Share Facebook  LinkedIn  Twitter  | Web Link | Return to Headlines



Abstract News © Copyright 2016 INFORMATION, INC.
Powered by Information, Inc.